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 SAA's Online Knowledge Series Archives Minimize

 Past Knowledge Series lectures have been archived and are available on the Members' Only side of SAAweb.

 

Campus Archaeology Programs: Why and How to Create Them

Date/Time

December 7, 2016, 3:00-4:00 ET

Description

This one-hour seminar will explain why a campus archaeology program is beneficial, and will outline how Goldstein created such a program and made it permanent and recurring at Michigan State University. The MSU Campus Archaeology Program has become an important way to train students, provide student funding, and demonstrate the value and importance of archaeology to a wide audience. Students that participate in the program gain invaluable research skills, in addition to experience working on time-sensitive projects. Students, faculty, staff, and alumni are naturally interested in the institution where they spend or have spent so much time, and learning about MSU’s past demonstrates to them the value of archaeology. MSU's program can serve as a model for schools that would like to implement their own Campus Archaeology Program.

 

Instructor

Dr. Lynne Goldstein has been a Professor of Anthropology at Michigan State University since 1996. She previously worked at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and the majority of her research has focused on Wisconsin and the Great Lakes region. Goldstein is currently Publications Director for the Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association.  She previously completed a four-year term as Editor of American Antiquity. Goldstein has authored numerous publications on archaeological topics, and has served and continues to serve on various national advisory committees on behalf of archaeology. She launched the Campus Archaeology Program at MSU in 2007 and in 2012 received an AT&T Instructional Technology Award for use and integration of social media into teaching an on-campus field school. 

Pricing

FREE to SAA members. Not available to non-members.

 

If You’re Not Having Fun, You’re Not Doing It Right

Date/Time

October 19, 2016, 3:00-4:00 ET.

Description

In this one-hour online presentation, past SAA president Dean Snow shares lessons learned from a lifetime in archaeology.  Mindful of the fact that the challenges facing young archaeologists today are dramatically different than those he faced, Snow reflects on how the profession has evolved through the decades, including the intellectual movements that have come and gone.  Although Snow notes that archaeology lacks the precision of hard science, he believes that archaeology should be based on established scientific principles, and he finds the substitution of advocacy for inquiry to be unwise.  He shares view that non-academic professional opportunities have strengthened the profession and that new technologies will help archaeologists more effectively uncover the puzzles of the past.

 

Instructor

Dean Snow has fifty years of experience in archaeological research and in the teaching of archaeology. He is a past president of the Society for American Archaeology. He retired from teaching at Penn State University in 2013.

 

Pricing

FREE to SAA members. Not available to non-members.

Current Perspectives on Complex Hunter-Gatherers

Date/Time

September  29, 2015, 3:00-4:00 EDT

Description

In the 1970s, archaeologists identified “complex hunter-gatherers,” hunter-gatherers displaying social and cultural traits, such as permanent inequality, which were thought to require agriculture. This produced intense research and theory building. More recently the concept has been critiqued as notions such as complexity and even of hunter-gatherers have been challenged. These issues are explored in a one-hour online presentation using examples from western North America.

Instructor

Kenneth M. Ames received his Ph.D. from Washington State University in 1976. He is Professor emeritus of Anthropology, Portland State University, and a past-President the Society for American Archaeology. His research focuses on the evolution of social complexity and on hunter-gatherers. His theoretical interests include the application of evolutionary theory to cultural change and the structure of archaeological theory. Ames has conducted archaeological field research in western North American since 1968 He is currently also involved in research on the northern British Columbia coast and the western North Pacific Rim. He has written and edited volumes on the archaeology and peoples of the Northwest Coast and has published in American Antiquity and many other venues. 

Pricing

FREE to SAA members. Not available to non-members.

Cultural Heritage Management in Developing Countries; Challenges and Opportunities for Archaeology and Archaeologists

Date/Time

October 20, 2015, 3:00-4:00 EDT 

Description

Cultural heritage management (CHM) in developing countries offers tremendous opportunities for archaeologists as well as challenges that must be overcome. National laws protecting cultural heritage in developing countries are often weak and poorly enforced. International conventions such as the 1972 UNESCO Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage highlight the importance of specific cultural heritage resources, but are not effective tools to manage the archaeological and cultural record. A more expansive opportunity to protect cultural heritage is present in regulations imposed by multilateral financial institutions, such as the World Bank, which have led to a dramatic increase in archaeological investigations in developing countries. Enforcement of these regulations requires that archaeologists in developing and developed countries work together to ensure that CHM frameworks are strengthened, sufficient training is available, archaeological research meets professional standards, reports are disseminated, and the public benefits. How we achieve these objectives in a pro-development climate is the focus of this one-hour online presentation.

Instructor

 

Jeffrey H. Altschul received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Brandeis University in 1982. He has co-founded two cultural heritage management (CHM) consulting firms—Statistical Research, Inc. (U.S.A.) and Nexus Heritage (U.K.)—and the SRI Foundation. Since 1975, Altschul has been involved in more than 1,000 CHM projects in North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. In the last decade, he has worked on several large, complex CHM projects in developing countries. He also has worked with the Inter-American Development Bank on its cultural heritage guidance note and with the World Bank on revisions to its social and environmental safeguards, including cultural heritage. Altschul is a past-Treasurer and past-President of the Society for American Archaeology. He has published widely, including articles in American Antiquity and Advances in Archaeological Practice.

 

Pricing

FREE to SAA members. Not available to non-members.

Flying in Llama-land: Aerial photography using drones, photogrammetry and 3D modeling of archaeological sites and features--experiences from the field

Date/Time

November 4, 2015, 3:00-4:00 EST.

Description

Small AUVs, or drones, have opened up new and unexpected possibilities for archaeologists. Aerial photos on demand, when you need them and in the conditions you want them, are a dream come true for us. They, by themselves, are a step forward, but used in conjunction with photogrammetry and GIS software can provide us with even more remarkable images of sites and archaeological features, making them real tools for archaeology and for the recording and protection of Cultural Patrimony. Furthermore, the recording of site using drones, and the production of orthophotography and 3D models is providing us with the most remarkable tools for archaeological survey and site protection. This one-hour online presentation will present some of the results of the intensive use of these technologies in Peru, of the lessons learned and mistakes to be avoided, both by the Ministry of Culture and by the San Jose de Moro Archaeological Program, where we don't build drones nor do we create the software, but we simply use these resources intensively.

Instructor

Dr. Luis Jaime Castillo Butters

Pricing

FREE to SAA members. Not available to non-members.


Timing is Everything – Humans and Climate Change

Date/Time

February 2, 2016,  3:00-4:00 EST.

Description

Professor Paul Mayewski will provide a short introduction to high resolution, multi-proxy ice core records that offer insights into the following. What is climate? Why does climate change? Ho w fast can climate change? How small a change is important? Have humans impacted climate and how? What are the health impacts for humans? How is atmospheric circulation changing and why does it matter? How might climate change in the future? How much could sea level rise and how fast? What is climate change today? Particular attention will be paid to the comparison of archaeological records with ice core climate reconstructions in order to assess the impacts of past changes in climate on the course of civilizations.

Instructor

Dr. Paul Andrew Mayewski is Director and Distinguished Professor of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine.  He is an internationally acclaimed climate scientist and explorer who has led more than 55 expeditions throughout Earth’s remotest reaches, produced more than 375 publications and several books, founded and led several high profile multi-disciplinary, international climate science projects, and appeared on CBS 60 Minutes, PBS NOVA, Good Morning America, BBC, Fox News, NPR Fresh Air, the Diane Rehm Show and numerous documentaries including the recent Emmy Award winner “The Years of Living Dangerously”.

Pricing

FREE to SAA members. Not available to non-members

 

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