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 FALL 2002 News AND publications Minimize

NEWS
NEW PUBLICATIONS

NEWS

 Kentucky and Uruguay Cooperate on Video/Website Project
The Kentucky-Uruguay Cultural Heritage Education Project premiered its educational video, The Prehistoric Mounds of Uruguay: Linking the Past and the Future/Los Constructores de Cerritos de Uruguay: Uniendo el Pasado y el Futuro on July 25, 2002 at the Uruguayan Embassy in Washington, D.C., and the launch of its bilingual website (http://www.dinacyt.gub.uy/proykent). The video and website form the core of a collaborative educational initiative linking educators and children in the northern and southern hemispheres in a joint exploration of the cultural heritage of both Uruguay and the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

In the video, viewers discover the rich 11,000-year history of Uruguay and learn about the results of archaeological research targeting the prehispanic mound-building societies that once flourished in the wetlands of Rocha Province. They accompany students from a public school in Rocha as they collect scientific data during excavation at a mound, and then they visit the school to see how the students used their archaeological field experience to explore topics in social studies and language learning. The video is designed as a teaching tool, and educators will find it useful for raising students' awareness of the importance of preserving our fragile and non-renewable cultural heritage. For copies of both versions of the video, contact KET, The Kentucky Network, 1-8..., or tapes@ket.org or www.ket.org.

At the project's website, http://www.dinacyt.gub.uy/proykent, visitors select either English or Spanish, and then explore the various links. For example, visitors can find out about the indigenous past of Kentucky and Uruguay, read about archaeological findings and special events, learn about what archaeology is and why archaeologists do it, and view pictures of artifacts and sites from both places. Teachers will find resource lists, while students can try activities or read stories written by students about their own archaeological fieldwork experiences at a Kentucky rockshelter or a Uruguayan mound. Both teachers and students can exchange information and raise questions with their counterparts and with project personnel.


NEW PUBLICATIONS

Book on Stonehenge for Young People Published
The first book in the series Digging for the Past, for young people 12 and up and archaeology-buffs, is now available. Stonehenge, by Nancy Stone Bernard and Caroline Malone, has been published by Oxford University Press and sells for $18. The book covers the myths behind the monument and what archaeologists have learned about the complicated task of building Stonehenge and the people who constructed it. Included in the book are charts on the archaeological history and the ancient history; sidebars on megaliths, scientific dating, and aerial discoveries; a glossary; and information on related sites in southwest England. The book is profusely illustrated with color and black-and-white illustrations and drawings. Stonehenge is now available from www.Amazon.com, or by calling Oxford University Press at 1-8....

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