Login Join | Donate | Annual Meeting | Career Center | SAA News | Marketplace | Contact   Search
   Minimize
 Print   

 
Fall 2003 Web sites of interest
Minimize

Junior Ranger Web Site Offers Activities About the Past
Visit WebRangers, the National Park Service on-line Junior Ranger program at www.nps.gov/webrangers/. The WebRanger program contains activities for learning about National Park sites for children in three age categories. Those interested in the past will want to explore Stories from the Past (ages 6-9), Yesterday and Today (ages 10-12,) and a spiffy exercise on Dendrochronology (ages 13 and older).

Archaeology Featured on Government Web Sites
The federal government provides much of its information via web sites. Below are listed some of the web sites that are currently highlighted.

Archeology for Interpreters: A Guide to the Knowledge of the Resource can help students learn about archeological methods and how archeological interpretations are made. It is organized around questions that include: What is archeology? What do archeologists do? How do archeologists determine how old things are? Look for it at www.cr.nps.gov/aad/afori/.

Effigy Mounds National Monument On-Line Teacher’s Guide offers 40 lesson ideas in archeology, art, language arts, math, science, social studies, and other subject areas. The web site also provides articles on the history, geology, and ecology of the mounds. Check it out at www.nps.gov/efmo/parks/table_of_contents.htm.

The Archaeology Channel Continues to Grow
New additions to The Archaeology Channel, the streaming video web site are now available at www.archaeologychannel.org, as follows:

  • Finding the Treasures of Nimrud—A stunning collection of jewelry and other precious artifacts was recovered in the late 1980s from Assyrian royal tombs near Mosul in northern Iraq. Although they have been compared to the contents of Tutankhamun’s tomb, these artifacts disappeared for nearly 13 years. This audio feature is the story of how this collection was rediscovered in the Central Bank of Iraq after the fall of Baghdad. In the aftermath of the looting that took place following the demise of the Saddam Hussein regime, many feared that this collection was lost forever along with countless other priceless objects from the National Museum and other places in Iraq. Early in June 2003, film-maker Jason Williams and his National Geographic camera crew succeeded in locating and recovering the Treasures of Nimrud and other precious heritage objects in the Central Bank of Iraq, where in 1990 they had been placed for safekeeping.
 Print   

  Minimize




 Print