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 Summer 2002 News AND publications Minimize

NEWS
NEW PUBLICATIONS

NEWS

AnthroNotes Receives Award for Excellence in Public Education

At the Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting in Denver, March 2002, AnthroNotes, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology, received the SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education, for "presenting archaeological and anthropological research to the public in an engaging and accessible style, and for encouraging the study of these disciplines in the classrooms across the nation."

The award went on to explain that over the past 23 years, 60 issues of AnthroNotes have been published and distributed to educators across the United States. With a current circulation of 9,000, it is a major vehicle of public outreach and education. AnthroNotes has, for more than two decades, set a standard for producing educational materials about archaeology and anthropology that are useful to those working in precollege, museum, and university settings. It was one of the early pioneers for public education in these fields and has been a model for others to follow. There is no doubt that AnthroNotes has made a difference in the understanding of archaeology and anthropology by countless students and teachers. For information on receiving AnthroNotes, email the Anthropology Outreach Office at the Smithsonian at  Anthroutreach@nmnh.si.edu.

Alaska Archaeologists Reach-Out to Kids

The months of April and May have been very busy for members of the Alaska Anthropological Association, Public Education Committee. April is Archaeology Month in Alaska, and a big push was made toward taking archaeology into Anchorage School District classrooms. For 8th graders at Goldenview Middle School, the students came to archaeology. The National Park Service's (NPS) Lake Clark Katmai Study Center hosted about 100 of the Goldenview kids in their offices and lab to learn about ongoing projects-historic cabin inventories and artifact analysis and curation-and to view slide shows of fieldwork. A local flintknapper shared his skills with the kids and NPS archaeologists provided indoor, hands-on mapping and artifact interpretation activities for them.

During Outdoor Week, held May 13-17, about 500 Anchorage 6th graders got the opportunity to shake the winter doldrums and welcome spring at the BLM Campbell Creek Tract. One of the activity stations, staffed by local archaeologists, was billed as the "Blue Tarp Site." Using a large blue tarp, prominently gridded off with orange tape into six one-meter squares, the archaeologists arranged artifacts-some replicas and some authentic northwest Alaska artifacts in an educational collection-for the kids to map onto grid paper. The kids were also asked to interpret the artifact clusters, some representing ancient hunting tools, and others pertaining to fishing or to personal adornment.

Information about any of the programs sponsored by the Alaska Anthropological Association, Public Education Committee, can be directed to Becky Saleeby at becky_saleeby@nps.gov.


NEW PUBLICATIONS


Alexandria Museum Publishes Teacher's Guide
Archaeologists at Work: A Teacher's Guide to Classroom Archaeology, second edition, is designed to help teachers integrate the study of archaeology into the school curriculum. It contains a multiple of ideas and activities to help further students' understanding of archaeology. It is an excellent resource-whether students are studying Alexandria, Virginia, or Alexandria, Egypt. It is available for $25 from the Alexandria Archaeology Museum. For more information, contact the Museum at 703-83... or archaeology@ci.alexandria.va.us. Or to place an order, fill out the order form at oha.ci.alexandria.va.us/shop/ar-shop.html.

Investigations at Catalhoyuk Featured in Dig Magazine
Read about the discovery of Catalhoyuk and how finds are changing archaeologists' and historians' views of early cities and communities, in the March/April issue of Dig magazine. Stories go on site in Turkey to meet and interview those involved in the 25-year project aimed at excavating and learning how the city developed and how the inhabitants lived. Ian Hodder, the director, explains why he feels archaeologists must not only record every find and observation in detail, but must also reflect on what they think the finds reveal. Meet Frank Matero and learn how his lab developed processes that allowed the site to be reopened and the wall paintings preserved. Let your mind work with the archaeologists' as they try to understand why burials were within the houses, what the bull shrines mean, and just what the statues of the mother goddess represent. Visit www.digonsite.comfor a free teacher's guide and more information on ordering this issue.


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