Login Join | Donate | Annual Meeting | Career Center | SAA News | Marketplace | Contact   Search
   Minimize
 Print   

 Summer 2002 web sites of interest Minimize

The Archaeology Channel Continues to Grow
New additions to The Archaeology Channel, the steaming video web site are now available at www.archaeologychannel.org, as follows:

     

  • Moundville: Journey Through Time--Eight hundred years ago a fortified town stood on the banks of the Black Warrior River in Alabama. It was a prehistoric metropolis, the ceremonial heart of a sophisticated Mississippian society. Today this town is called Moundville. Its inhabitants were highly organized, and with organization came power, trade and wealth on an unprecedented scale. The people created huge earthworks and mounds, but also refined works of art. This video explores Moundville and the prehistoric cultural marvel that it represents.

     

  • The Ancient Hydraulis--The first keyboard musical instrument ever devised was the hydraulis, invented nearly 2,300 years ago and used widely throughout the Hellenistic and Roman worlds. The remarkable story of its recent reconstruction, based on archaeological and documentary evidence, is the subject of this latest video.

     

  • Ghosts of the Mountains explores the pre-contact disappearance of the Monongahela Culture in the upper Ohio River Valley.

     

  • The Search for Amelia Earhart--The 1937 disappearance of Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, in the Pacific Ocean is one of the most compelling mysteries of the last century. Some may be surprised to learn that archaeology is playing a major role in the on-going investigation of this puzzle. In fact, well-known American archaeologist Dr. Tom King is a central figure in the research effort. Listen to his views in this audio interview.

     

  • Yaxuná: Archaeology of an Ancient Maya City--More than 1,000 years ago in northern Yucatan, Maya people from the great city of Cobá built a 60-mile stone causeway to Yaxuná, imposing an alliance on the local government. When warriors of Uxmal joined this alliance, Yaxuná found itself at the heart of a war against legendary Chichén Itzá, a war the alliance clearly lost. Now archaeologists working with local Maya people have uncovered evidence of the ritual destruction inflicted upon Yaxuná by that war's victors, as well as much more about life in a classic and once-beautiful Maya city.

     

  • Balancing the Cosmos--On a lake set amongst volcanoes in the Guatemalan highlands lies the contemporary Mayan town of Santiago Atitlan. As keepers of what they believe to be the very navel of the world, the people of the town keep the cosmos itself in balance by performing rituals that echo the ancient traditions of their prehispanic Mayan ancestors. This video, which is a work in progress, features the ceremonies carried out by the townspeople during Easter Week, an outwardly Christian celebration with a surprising measure of ancient Mayan practices.
 Print   

  Minimize



 Print