Login Join | Donate | Annual Meeting | Career Center | SAA News | Marketplace | Contact   Search
   Minimize
 Print   

 WINTER 2002 events Minimize

EVENTS
ARCHAEOLOGY WEEKS/MONTHS

EVENTS

Indiana State Museum Schedules Archaeology Programs for Kids

The Indiana State Museum is organizing a new workshop for students in grades 4-12, called Indiana Culture History Mystery. In addition, Archeology Camp, geared for grades 5-8, is scheduled for June 9-11 and June 16-18 at the museum. Campers will participate in a variety of hands-on activities focusing on learning the basics of archaeology. For more information visit the museum web site at www.indianamuseum.org or contact Gail Brown at 317-234-2412 or gbrown@dnr.state.in.us.

Hohokam Arts & Culture to be Discussed
Archaeologist Allen Dart of Tucson's Old Pueblo Archaeology Center will present Arts and Culture of the Ancient Hohokam Indians, a free slide-illustrated presentation with a prehistoric artifact display, at three Arizona locations in March during Arizona Archaeology Awareness Month. From the sixth through fifteenth centuries, the Hohokam culture flourished in the valleys of southern Arizona's major tributaries of the Colorado River. Archaeologists use artifacts, architecture, and other material culture items to identify Hohokam archaeological sites and to interpret how these Native Americans tamed the Sonoran Desert for eight centuries before their culture mysteriously disappeared. In this presentation, Dart illustrates the material culture of the Hohokam to help audiences understand who the Hohokam were and how they lived. He presents possible interpretations about their relationships to the natural world and to the contemporary cultures of the southwestern U.S. and Mexico, their time reckoning, their religious practices, beliefs, and deities, and possible reasons for the eventual demise of their way of life.

The first presentation will be for the Western National Parks Association's Arizona program at the Casa Grande Ruins National Historical Park, Coolidge, on March 8. For details, contact Denise Shultz at 520-723-3172 or Denise_M_Shultz@nps.gov. The second will be for the Tempe Historical Museum, Tempe, on March 19. For details, contact Jim McBride at 480-350-5105 or James.McBride@asu.edu. The third will be for the San Xavier Indian Community at the San Xavier District Office, Tucson, on March 19. For details, contact Edward Encinas at 520-294-5727 or  eencinas@sanxavdist.org.

 

Indiana State Museum Schedules Archaeology Programs for Kids
The Indiana State Museum is organizing a new workshop for students in grades 4-12, called Indiana Culture History Mystery. In addition, Archeology Camp, geared for grades 5-8, is scheduled for June 9-11 and June 16-18 at the museum. Campers will participate in a variety of hands-on activities focusing on learning the basics of archaeology. For more information visit the museum web site at www.indianamuseum.org or contact Gail Brown at 317-234-2412 or gbrown@dnr.state.in.us.

Hohokam Arts & Culture to be Discussed
Archaeologist Allen Dart of Tucson's Old Pueblo Archaeology Center will present Arts and Culture of the Ancient Hohokam Indians, a free slide-illustrated presentation with a prehistoric artifact display, at three Arizona locations in March during Arizona Archaeology Awareness Month. From the sixth through fifteenth centuries, the Hohokam culture flourished in the valleys of southern Arizona's major tributaries of the Colorado River. Archaeologists use artifacts, architecture, and other material culture items to identify Hohokam archaeological sites and to interpret how these Native Americans tamed the Sonoran Desert for eight centuries before their culture mysteriously disappeared. In this presentation, Dart illustrates the material culture of the Hohokam to help audiences understand who the Hohokam were and how they lived. He presents possible interpretations about their relationships to the natural world and to the contemporary cultures of the southwestern U.S. and Mexico, their time reckoning, their religious practices, beliefs, and deities, and possible reasons for the eventual demise of their way of life.

The first presentation will be for the Western National Parks Association's Arizona program at the Casa Grande Ruins National Historical Park, Coolidge, on March 8. For details, contact Denise Shultz at 520-723-3172 or Denise_M_Shultz@nps.gov. The second will be for the Tempe Historical Museum, Tempe, on March 19. For details, contact Jim McBride at 480-350-5105 or James.McBride@asu.edu. The third will be for the San Xavier Indian Community at the San Xavier District Office, Tucson, on March 19. For details, contact Edward Encinas at 520-294-5727 or eencinas@sanxavdist.org.

 

ARCHAEOLOGY WEEKS/MONTHS

Indiana Archaeology Month Set for September
Indiana Archaeology Month will be September 2003. This is Indiana's largest yearly event for public education regarding archaeology. Many educational materials and numerous events will be available. Contact Amy Johnson, Archaeology Month Coordinator, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, at 317-232-1646 or check the web site at www.in.gov/dnr/historic/archeomonth/home.htm for more information.

Arkansas Archeology Month Moved to March
In 2003, Arkansas Archeology Month will move to March. The theme for the 2003 event will be Archeology & the Louisiana Purchase, in order to tie in with the state's Louisiana Purchase celebration. Information on Arkansas Archeology Month can be found on the Arkansas Archeological Survey's web site at www.uark.edu/campus-resources/archinfo/archmonth.html. For more information, contact Mary Kwas, Archeology Month Coordinator, at 479-575-6549 or mkwas@uark.edu.

 

 Print   

  Minimize



 Print