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Editor's Corner

Continuing the trend from the November Bulletin, this issue is dominated by educational concerns. In addition to two more statements by the Wakulla Springs working group--this time on recommended reforms to graduate and undergraduate education in archaeology--we also have a review of the CRM sections of two recent textbooks. And if that's not enough, we have another tale of woe (but with a reasonably happy ending) about teaching precollegiate students about fieldwork. I can hear the grumbling already. More on education? It may remind some of the SAA old timers of the "great Maya controversy" (my choice of terms) American Antiquity endured in the 1970s and beginning of the 1980s. At the time, some thought the journal was dominated by articles and book reviews about the Maya. Whether it was true or not is irrelevant--most of the articles were interesting, well-informed, and useful. Even if you think we've overstressed the importance of education, I nevertheless hope you find the articles stimulating. I can think of no higher priority for SAA and its mission than public education. Our success or failure here will in great part determine the future of archaeology over the next decade. On this note, I would like to welcome Teresa Hoffman as associate editor for the new Public Education column. All Public Education Committee submissions to the Bulletin must come to us through Teresa. She can be reached at thoffman@netzone.com.

Authors take note: Starting with this issue, the contents of SAA Bulletin will be copyrighted. Although authors will continue to enjoy rights to their intellectual property, I decided to ask the Board of Directors for this protection to preserve and extend SAA's rights as well. The Board agreed to this at their November meeting, and I explain the implications of this policy on page 12.


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