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Public Education Committee -- Update

Teresa Hoffman

PEC Debuts New Publication -- In October 1999, the SAA PEC will initiate a new monograph series, Teaching with Archaeology, with a volume that focuses on underwater archaeology. Each issue in the series, which will be produced in the spring and fall, will examine the concepts, methodologies, and relevance of some aspect of archaeological research. Designed to help precollegiate teachers to introduce archaeology into their classrooms, the monographs will be equally suitable for archaeologists, museum educators, and interpreters who wish to expand their understanding and appreciation of the myriad components of the discipline.

The first monograph, History Beneath the Sea: Nautical Archaeology in the Classroom, will include an overview of the topic; four case studies relating to historic shipwrecks; an article about artifact conservation; and educational materials, including a lesson plan and list of resources. All contributors are professionally trained underwater archaeologists who have developed public programs in addition to conducting fieldwork. Additional information about Volume 1, and details about ordering this and forthcoming monographs, will appear in the November issue of the SAA Bulletin.

Participants at the Native American Educators' Workshop

Native American Educators Benefit from Archaeology WorkshopThe SAA PEC and Haskell Indian Nations University Foundation cosponsored the third annual "Teaching With Archaeology: New Perspectives on Science and Culture for Native American Educators" at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas, on July 12­17, 1999. The workshops are designed for educators of Native American students. Participants in the workshop came from reservation schools, museums, and national parks throughout the country with the goal of creating a pathway for teaching archaeology in their educational settings. The July workshop focused on classroom lessons, archaeological research protocols, and critical issues on how archaeology affects Native American tribes. The participants went through lessons in "Intrigue of the Past" and role-played as students in learning how to integrate archaeology into math, social studies, science, and art. Participants commented that "the activities were engaging and resourceful. Overall, the learning experiences and sharing of information was insightful and invigorating. The learning that took place was productive and inspiring in all areas of life. It was neat to hear the different views people had on archaeology and to come to an understanding on how a networking of respect and knowledge could help in making the study of the past more meaningful." This most recent workshop is one of many efforts to build bridges of understanding and collaboration between Native Americans and archaeologists and in the interpretation and respect for past cultures.

Teresa Hoffman, associate editor for the Public Education Committee column, is with Archaeological Consulting Services in Tempe, Arizona

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Milwaukee area archaeologists were delighted to see this large billboard looming over I-94 east of the western edge of the city. It's the creation of Steve Lorenz of Factor Creative. "No offense meant to archaeologists," said Lorenz, who explains he has no connection with archaeology, other than a cousin Nancy in Atlanta who's an archaeologist. But he will testify that Poblocki really does a bang-up thorough paving jobthey paved his driveway.

Alice Kehoe

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