Past Events

[Deeper Digs] Illuminating Marginalized Stories from the Jim Crow Era in Historic Preservation

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[Deeper Digs] Illuminating Marginalized Stories from the Jim Crow Era in Historic Preservation

When: December 01, 2022 2:00-4:00 PM ET

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Alison Rose Jefferson, MHC, PhD

Dr. Jefferson is a publicly engaged independent historian, heritage conservation consultant and a third generation Californian. Her research interests explore the intersection of American history, the African American experience in California, historical memory, spatial justice, and cultural tourism. She has worked extensively across Los Angeles to elucidate, re-center, and reinsert the erased and overlooked African America experience in local history, heritage conservation efforts and the American identity. She is the author of the book Living the California Dream: African American Leisure Sites during the Jim Crow Era (University of Nebraska Press, 2020).
This seminar includes a discussion of research methods in illuminating erased and overlooked stories about African Americans’ fight for dignity, equal access, and the full range of human experience and self-fulfillment. Drawing from her research in California, the instructor takes a fresh approach to looking at the historical practices of relaxation and recreation at outdoor and public spaces for all people at beaches, mountains, and other scenic locales connected to the long freedom rights struggle. Leisure was not an optional add-on to civil rights, but an essential component of liberty. Attendees will learn how some of these site histories and present-day public programming are shaping today and the future with examples from Los Angeles. Most of these places demonstrate a social heritage of action and occupation of space that have implications for broadening the American identity and for commemorative justice due to reinsertion of the African American experience into landscapes and civic memory where it has been ignored.
  1. Describe new ways to think about exploration of marginalized histories.
  2. Provide overview of public programming examples that illuminate and reinsert erased or overlooked stories of marginalized groups into local landscapes and civic memory and how this is shaping these communities and broader society today for the future.
  3. Explore new ways to think about intangible heritage illumination and social justice programming for historic preservation/heritage conservation, nature conservation and cultural tourism.

[SALSA] Experiencias estudiantiles e interacción con la comunidad dentro del Proyecto de investigación arqueológica vida cotidiana en el antiguo Lambayeque (PIAVCAL)

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[SALSA] Experiencias estudiantiles e interacción con la comunidad dentro del Proyecto de investigación arqueológica vida cotidiana en el antiguo Lambayeque (PIAVCAL)

When: November 16, 2022 5:00-6:00 PM ET

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: None


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Carlos Osores Mendives
La ponencia de Carlos Osores Mendives girará en torno a la aplicación de la experiencia estudiantil en arqueología a través de diferentes niveles (estudiantes de pregrado, egresados y egresadas, y un licenciado que recientemente egresó de posgrado de maestría en Gobierno y Políticas Públicas) dentro del Proyecto de investigación arqueológica vida cotidiana en el antiguo Lambayeque (PIAVCAL). Este proyecto se desarrolló en la costa norte del Perú, específicamente en la región Lambayeque y valle bajo del río Zaña. El proyecto tuvo un doble objetivo: (1) entender la vida diaria y doméstica a partir del entendimiento de dos complejos arqueológicos (Cerro la Guitarra y Complejo Úcupe, El Pueblo) con énfasis en el periodo intermedio tardío (principalmente entre los años 1100 – 1470 d.C.), y (2) conocer los conflictos actuales entre la comunidad local y la conservación de los dos complejos arqueológicos. Adicionalmente, debido a que las unidades de excavación se realizaron, mayoritariamente, en "zonas periféricas" o espacios muy próximos a las viviendas actuales, todo el equipo tuvo contacto constante con la comunidad a través del diálogo y su participación en el proyecto; de manera muy interesante, la comunidad se mostró abierta para mostrar sus opiniones y dudas en torno a los complejos arqueológicos.
The Student Affairs Lecture Series in Archaeology (SALSA) provides an opportunity to hear student members present on their current research as well as a space to discuss and connect with other students.

[Deeper Digs] Characterization of Obsidian and Coarse to Fine-Paste Ceramics with Handheld XRF

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[Deeper Digs] Characterization of Obsidian and Coarse to Fine-Paste Ceramics with Handheld XRF

When: November 15, 2022 10:00-12:00 PM ET

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Lucas R M Johnson, PhD, RPA, Far Western Anthropological Research Group, Inc.

Dr. Johnson's research at Caracol, Belize began in 2010 and initiated his training and application of ED-XRF on over 2,000 ancient Maya obsidian artifacts. Through this geochemical and technological analysis, he learned the basics of XRF physics, the importance of source reference material, and advanced statistical methods used to assign artifacts to known sources to assess ancient regional trade through time. Concurrent with this project, he worked with an international team to characterize obsidian artifacts from two project locations in Ethiopia. Through these projects, he established relationships with XRF specialists and developed a deeper knowledge of portable XRF instruments. Currently, as a practicing archaeologist in cultural resource management, he is expected to apply XRF analysis to obsidian, other volcanic rocks, and potentially other materials in conventional and in often creative ways. As a member of a laboratory team at Far Western Anthropological Research Group, Inc. and working toward advancing technical reports and research papers, he has stayed current with XRF literature describing analyses of various materials, taught other lab staff the fundamentals of XRF, and trained them to use an XRF instrument.

Marc Marino, MA, RPA, University of Arkansas

Marc Marino’s archaeological training with pXRF as an undergraduate student began with Dr. Lucas Johnson at the University of Central Florida Archaeology Laboratory in 2011. Subsequent training with Dr. Wesley D. Stoner, in both pXRF analysis and statistical analysis of data obtained with Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), built on that foundation at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. His internship at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) with Dr. Brandi Lee MacDonald focused on the trade and exchange of decorated ceramics and obsidian in Aztec Period Mexico (specifically on the independent Tlaxcallan State). While his dissertation research was accomplished using NAA, XRF, and pXRF of obsidian, ceramics, clays, and sediments, Dr. MacDonald also introduced him to other applications of chemical analysis, including the analysis of ochres and pigments. Combined, these experiences have provided exposure to a wide range of projects across broad geographic areas.
Applications of XRF in archaeology have expanded beyond the analysis of homogenous materials, such as obsidian, to include more heterogenous materials used, created, formed, or associated with human practices. Applications therefore include characterizations of ceramics, metals, glasses, soils, sediments, plasters, pigments/ residues, cherts, and metavolcanic or metasedimentary rocks. While obsidian analysis is relatively straightforward, the other materials require additional procedures before formulating interpretations based on geochemical attributes. This online seminar presents two case studies, one using obsidian artifacts from the western Great Basin and one using both coarse and fine-paste ceramics from Mesoamerica. In this seminar, the instructors examine appropriate methods to prepare specimens, to assess the precision and accuracy of results obtained, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different sample preparation techniques. While it is recognized that a ‘one size fits all’ method does not exist for all pXRF applications, we discuss what factors should be given careful consideration if the goal is to share data across projects and emphasize that such results are of the greatest utility to clients and stakeholders alike.
  1. Introduce the method of XRF to those who may or may not have access, but are interested in using XRF to answer anthropological questions relating to obsidian and ceramics.
  2. Present case studies by which attendees may learn how to perform a specific analysis.
  3. Outline what is required for XRF analysis of a given material and the limitations of XRF in analyzing certain materials.
  4. Describe the fundamental physics of XRF and how software transforms XRF spectral to analytical units (i.e., calibrations).
  5. Explain the basics of analyzing parts per million or weight percent versus untransformed photon peak counts (i.e., statistical procedures).

[Rising Scholars] On Common Ground: A Collaborative Archaeological Partnership at Perage, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico with Mark Agostini

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[Rising Scholars] On Common Ground: A Collaborative Archaeological Partnership at Perage, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico with Mark Agostini

When: November 10, 2022 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: None


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Mark Agostini, BA, MA, Brown University

Mark Agostini grew up in the town of Medfield, Massachusetts and from an early age became interested in archaeology and anthropology. He attended the University of Vermont, Burlington as an undergraduate majoring in Anthropology and Film. While there he became interested in archaeology of the American Southwest. Through the support of an NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Fellowship, he completed an honors thesis exploring shifts in pottery traditions and communities of practice at sites in the Silver Creek region of East-Central Arizona. In 2016, he entered the Anthropological Archaeology PhD program at Brown University and since then has focused on methods of ceramic analysis like archaeometry and petrography while adopting new and less invasive approaches like LiDAR analysis, and surface artifact surveys of archaeological sites. His dissertation project is a collaborative archaeology partnership with the Pueblo de San Ildefonso in New Mexico, which aims to address questions concerning San Ildefonso Pueblo's archaeological and ethnographic ties to their earliest ancestral villages atop the Pajarito Plateau and in the Rio Grande Valley (1300 – 1600 CE).
Ancestors of the descendant Pueblo people living in the Tewa Basin of what is now the northern Rio Grande region of New Mexico experienced significant social, political, and economic transformations beginning in the late-thirteenth and early-fourteenth centuries. This talk summarizes the progress of a collaborative archaeological partnership with the Pueblo de San Ildefonso that investigates and builds on aspects of their historical connections to the Pajarito Plateau and their earliest ancestral village in the Rio Grande Valley called Perage (LA 41). Through LiDAR analysis, digital re-mapping, and artifact survey, this project evaluates how ancestral villages of San Ildefonso Pueblo on the Pajarito Plateau and Perage in the Rio Grande Valley contributed to the growth and development of the early Tewa cultural landscape and contemporary San Ildefonso Pueblo.
The Rising Scholars seminars are opportunities to learn from students and early career archaeologists as they share their current research or emerging methods and theories.

[Deeper Digs] GIS and Archaeology: Real World Examples of How GIS Can Benefit Archaeologists

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[Deeper Digs] GIS and Archaeology: Real World Examples of How GIS Can Benefit Archaeologists

When: October 20, 2022 1:00-3:00 PM ET

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Teresa L. Gregory, MS, Statistical Research, Inc.

Teresa Gregory received a BA in Cultural Anthropology/Archaeology from UC Santa Barbara in 1996, a BS in Molecular & Cellular Biology from U.Arizona in 2001, and a MS in GIST from U. Arizona in 2016. She worked as a field archaeologist in CRM for four years before moving into basic research and "molecular" archaeology. In 2015, she became the Administrator of the ASM/Archaeological Records Office and GIS Manage of AZSITE updating and improving the GIS platform for the archaeological community and incorporating her knowledge of Esri ArcGIS products, Python, SQL, GPS collection devices and many other facets of a well-rounded GIS professional. In 2017, Teresa moved to a private CRM firm, Statistical Research, and began assisting the Arizona Army National Guard/Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs modifying a suite of Esri-based tools, WebApps, and geodatabases in the Microsoft Azure Government Cloud to aide in project planning and mission readiness.
In this course, the instructor will introduce real world examples of GIS platforms and applications that benefit the study of cultural and natural resources. Attendees will learn about cutting-edge Esri GIS software (ArcGIS Pro, Enterprise, AGOL, Monitor, Survey123) for data collection and manipulation; Adobe Acrobat/Sign for reviewing and signing documents; Python (ArcPy) for coding and creating more efficient GIS tools; Microsoft Azure Government Cloud Server for data storage; and much more. These products can aide archaeologists in smaller, simple projects or multi-scalar larger projects. GIS can be enjoyable and helpful from start to finish for archaeological projects.
  1. Describe what ArcGIS Pro is and how to use it, as well as other useful software
  2. Explore how GIS can aide the study of cultural and natural resources
  3. Explain, with examples, how to store, retrieve, and integrate GIS data