Upcoming Events

Please be aware when registering, all times are in the Eastern Time Zone. Even for free events, you will need to click the "Proceed to Checkout" button and "Submit Order" to complete your registration. If you do not receive an automated confirmation email, or if you have any questions about registration, please email onlineseminars@saa.org.

[Foundational Skills] Advocacy for Archaeologists: Building Strong Relationships with Local, State, and Federal Policymakers

When: December 08, 2022 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; $69 for non-members

Group Registration: Free to SAA members; $89 for non-members


Suanna Selby Crowley, PhD, RPA, HeadFort Consulting, LLC

Also known as "Dr. Dirt" for her domestic and international work in CRM, heritage preservation, and geoarchaeology, Suanna Selby Crowley is an applied anthropologist with a background in digital media, public relations, fundraising, and advocacy. On a mission to make information resonant, Dr. Crowley conducts and supports research and policy initiatives across the hard and social sciences to better communicate the data that impacts our lives—even “breaking the internet” in 2019 with a custom media plan for Harvard
University and the Smithsonian Institution. Originally from Washington, D.C., she is the founder of HeadFort Consulting, LLC, in Greater Boston, and teams with global clients, research collaborations, and individuals to amplify discovery and cultural understanding. Connect with Dr. Crowley on LinkedIn and Twitter.
Archaeology and archaeological resources are in the spotlight as never before. Digital, print, and traditional media raise tremendous awareness for discoveries and cultural data. This enhanced visibility means that researchers and historic preservation professionals need better tools to shape policy on issues such as preservation, repatriation, funding, access, and equity. How can archaeologists become skilled advocates for important research and resources? This workshop will introduce the methods and best practices of cultivating outreach to federal, state, and local policymakers. Learn how to start the conversation, create impact, and follow up with lawmakers for positive change.
  1. Explain best practices and approaches to advocacy with federal, state, and local policymakers
  2. Describe the structure of a typical advocacy meeting and to outline a conversational script appropriate for federal, state, and local policymakers
  3. Highlight the importance of building robust quantitative and qualitative approaches through a case for support and through storytelling
  4. Describe the process of building a relationship with policymakers through follow-up and continued partnership

[Knowledge Series] Looking Outward with the Past: Sixty Years of Attempting Public Outreach with Brian Fagan

When: January 31, 2023 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: None


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Brian Fagan, PhD, Emeritus, University of California, Santa Barbara

Dr. Fagan is a Cambridge-trained archaeologist, who spent his early career in East and Central Africa working on the African Iron Age. This research involved extensive fieldwork, also public outreach. Since coming to the United States in 1966, he has specialized in communicating archaeology to both students and general audiences. A combination of large class teaching, textbook writing, also lecturing and writing for general audiences around the world has given him a unique perspective on the challenges of practicing public outreach. His talk will revolve around his long experience in such work during a multi-faceted career.

Effective public outreach is now a central issue in archaeology. The instructor will take attendees on a journey through the day-to-day challenges of lecturing and writing about the past for general audiences. He will use his first-hand experience and examples from around the world to highlight some of the challenges of working full-time on public outreach whether in the classroom or outside it—until recently not a popular activity for archaeologists. How do you write successfully about archaeology for the general public? What are the potential careers for those doing this? This is a seminar that will explore a growing, and often neglected segment of archaeological work.

The Knowledge Series seminars are opportunities to learn from prominent archaeologists as they share their experiences and expertise.

[Deeper Digs] Quantification in Zooarchaeology: Calculating and Critiquing NISP, MNI, and MNE

When: February 24, 2023 1:00-3:00 PM ET

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Gillian Wong, PhD, RPA, University of Tuebingen and Metropolitan Community College - Kansas City

Dr. Wong received a PhD in Archaeological Sciences from the University of Tuebingen (Germany), a MS in Anthropology from the University of Utah, and a BA in Anthropology from the University of California, Davis. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Tuebingen and an adjunct professor of anthropology at Metropolitan Community College - Kansas City. She is a zooarchaeologist who is particularly interested in how large-scale environmental changes affected past foragers on the local-level. She is currently involved in two research projects, one at Langmahdhalde, a Paleolithic site in southwest Germany, and one at Boomplaas Cave in South Africa. Although both projects focus on paleoecology, she uses different methods at each. At Langmahdhalde, she now focuses on traditional zooarchaeological methods and stable isotopes, while at Boomplaas Cave, she is a microfaunal specialist.
This course is designed for archaeologists at any stage in their career (including students and late career stage) who are not specialists in zooarchaeology or who do not work with the quantification units used regularly in zooarchaeology. We will focus on learning about three of the most commonly used quantification units: Number of Identified Specimens (NISP), Minimum Number of Elements (MNE), and Minimum Number of Individuals (MNI). We will learn how to calculate these units and the history of their development, but, more importantly, will also learn how to interpret them and evaluate their use and applicability to research questions. This course will be broken up into lecture, practical, and discussion portions that will give participants the tools to easily and more accurately interpret zooarchaeological studies that use these three units. Additionally, reference materials, lecture slides, and study examples will be provided to all participants.
  1. Explain how NISP, MNE, and MNI are calculated
  2. Describe the limitations of each of these quantification units
  3. Analyze when it is appropriate to apply each of these quantification units
  4. Be able to critically evaluate and understand these units in colleagues' research
  5. Be able to discuss how these units apply to and can address specific research questions

[Foundational Skills] Technical Writing for Cultural Resource Management: What It Is, Is Not, and How to Do It Efficiently

When: March 08, 2023 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; $69 for non-members

Group Registration: Free to SAA members; $89 for non-members


Jerryll Moreno, MA, RPA, Commonwealth Heritage Group, Inc.

Ms. Moreno is principal investigator with Commonwealth Heritage Group, LLC in Tempe, Arizona. She has 30 years of experience in cultural resource management (CRM) in the western United States. 20 were spent in Arizona leading surveys, testing, data recovery, and monitoring projects for a variety of municipal, state, and federal agencies. Her experience includes oversight of technical reports, draft environmental impact statements, land use plans, treatment plans, permitting, and synthesis of archaeological remains and analyses. In addition to her MA in anthropology, she holds a master’s certification in scholarly publishing and has published webinars on technical writing and editing with the American Cultural Resources Association. Ms. Moreno has served as a freelance book editor and production manager for university presses and global publishers in archaeology. Other past publishing positions include serving as the book review editor for the Kiva: The Journal of Southwestern Anthropology and History, for which she continues to serve on the publication committee. And she previously served as the managing editor of the Journal of Arizona Archaeology. With her diverse publishing and report-writing background, Ms. Moreno brings new insight to the process of writing for CRM and offers solutions that increase reader accessibility—the hallmark of technical writing—and reduce the production time and cost of deliverables.
The vast majority of writing in CRM is for non-archaeological audiences, yet the writing guidelines we traditionally use in modern CRM adhere to an outdated academic writing style. In modern CRM, this style dictates that we remove ourselves from our work in order to appear objective. Adhering to this requires a heavy reliance on passive and intransitive sentence structures. Unfortunately for budgets and clients, this writing approach is difficult and slow to read, and it is expensive to write, edit, and produce. This course focuses on guiding attendees in applying basic technical writing principals in everyday CRM report writing. These foundational skills can be developed into company training modules for new CRM employees as they enter the profession, transforming how we communicate with each other, our clients, and the public. This seminar will include surveys to test knowledge acquisition along the way and “take-home” cheat sheets.
1. Explain the difference between technical and academic writing
2. Describe what plain language is and how to apply it in CRM reports
3. Identify common pitfalls in cultural resources writing so authors can course correct while still in the drafting stage
4. Improve basic Word skills that allow for increased efficiency in the editing and writing process

[Deeper Digs] Obsidian Hydration Dating

When: April 18, 2023 1:00-3:00 PM ET

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Alexander Rogers, MS, MA, RPA, Maturango Museum Curator Emeritus

Alexander (Sandy) is Archaeology Curator Emeritus of the Maturango Museum of Ridgecrest, California. He holds advanced degrees in both physics and archaeological anthropology. Over the past 15 years he has published over twenty papers and two book chapters developing and applying the science and mathematics of obsidian hydration dating (OHD). He regularly conducts such analyses in support of CRM firms and academic projects, and is currently working with colleagues on further understanding of OHD at the molecular level. He has led OHD workshops at annual meetings of the Society for California Archaeology, the Association of Oregon Archaeologists, and the Northwest Anthropological Conference.
The goal of this seminar is to provide insight into the theory and methods of obsidian hydration dating (OHD), a useful addition to the archaeologists’ toolbox for chronometric analysis. It should help enable attendees to ask the right questions, principal investigators to select appropriate methods, and analysts in performing chronometric analyses. The workshop will cover the basic principles of obsidian hydration and the models employed in dating; how to control for temperature and obsidian water content; methods for computing a hydration rate; guidelines for data analysis; and numerous cautions. An link to download a summary document on OHD will be provided, and an Excel spreadsheet with numerical models for conducting an OHD analysis. Mathematics will be kept to a minimum, but cannot be avoided entirely.
  1. Describe the science behind obsidian hydration dating (OHD), especially recent advances
  2. Outline the key methods of determining ages with OHD, and the steps involved
  3. Highlight the limitations of the method, in terms of both accuracy and the consumptive nature of the lab work