Upcoming Events

Please be aware when registering, all times are in the Eastern Time Zone. Even for free events, you will need to click the "Proceed to Checkout" button and "Submit Order" to complete your registration. If you do not receive an automated confirmation email, or if you have any questions about registration, please email onlineseminars@saa.org.

Oral History and Archaeology [Deeper Digs]

When: February 29, 2024 2:00-4:00 PM ET

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-Certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Patricia Markert, PhD, RPA, Western University

Patricia Markert is an historical archaeologist and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Western University. She received her PhD from Binghamton University and a Master’s of Applied Anthropology from the University of Maryland, College Park. She has over ten years of oral history experience. Markert currently directs the Castro Colonies Oral History Project in Medina County, Texas, which is part of a broader community-based archaeology program examining place-making in the wake of Alsatian, German, and Mexican migration to the area. Her dissertation, Making Alsatian Texas: An Archaeological, Linguistic, and Ethnographic Study of Place and Migration in Castroville and D’Hanis, TX, drew on linguistic anthropology theory and methods to make sense of oral history data alongside archaeological data.

Oral history is a valuable tool for archaeological research. It is also its own field with well-established methods and theory; a source of narrative data that involves memory, storytelling, and the relationship between interviewee and interviewer; and a touchstone method for community-based and collaborative research. Like any approach, doing oral history requires proper training, research design, and attention to ethics. This can be difficult terrain to navigate for archaeologists working to stay current in our own field. This seminar provides tools and resources that will help archaeologists conduct ethical and informed oral history research as part of an archaeological project. We will discuss the mechanics of an oral history project, including planning, research design, interviewing, ethics, and equipment. We will also touch on aspects of post-processing, transcription, and analysis, the challenges and importance of storage and curation, and ways to make sense of oral and narrative data.  

  1. To broadly understand the equipment, methods, theories, and ethics of oral history research.
  2. To assess how oral history contributes to archaeological research and whether oral history is an appropriate tool for a given project.
  3. To know the steps needed to imagine, design, and implement an oral history interview or project as part of a larger archaeological research design.

The Essential Drone Survey: Why, What, Where, When, and How to Become a Drone Pilot [Deeper Digs]

When: March 05, 2024 2:00-4:00 PM ET

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Victoria M. Sharp MA, JD, RPA, Rutgers University

Victoria M. Sharp, MA, JD, RPA is an FAA Certified Remote (drone) Pilot and Registered Professional Archaeologist. Her Master of Arts thesis, which will be published in the 2024 edition of the Journal of Middle Atlantic Archaeology, focuses on a sustainable archaeological approach to hidden gravesite discovery using drone technology.
This introductory course will provide the versatile context needed to deploy a drone for an archaeological research design and CRM/Historical Preservation promotional videos, the types of drones available for the best fit for a research design, what terrain and weather is best to fly, and specialized mapping tools that are used to process the drone imagery and video. The course will also provide an overview of the FAA Remote (drone) Certification Process.
1. Learn when to use drone surveys in CRM projects.
2. To provide information on how drone surveys are a sustainable, minimally invasive approach to below-ground artifact and feature discovery.
3. Learn how versatile drone surveys and videos can be used to promote the CRM industry and educate the public at a low cost. 


Opportunities for Archaeologists in Public Writing and Communication [Foundational Skills]

When: March 27, 2024 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: None


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; $69 for non-members

Group Registration: Free to SAA members; $89 for non-members


Bridget A. Alex, Ph.D., SAPIENS Magazine

Dr. Bridget Alex is the archaeology and biological anthropology editor for SAPIENS, a digital magazine produced by anthropologists for the public. As a freelance writer, she has published more than 140 popular science stories for outlets including Discover, Science, Archaeology, Atlas Obscura, and Smithsonian. Bridget has taught anthropology and science communication at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena City College, and Harvard University.

Dr. Alex earned her Ph.D. in archaeology and human evolutionary biology from Harvard. Supported by the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright Program, and other awards, her research focused on the spread of Homo sapiens and extinction of other humans, such as Neanderthals, over the past 200,000 years. More broadly, she used biogeochemical methods like radiocarbon dating to reconstruct the chronology and biogeography of past human groups. This methodological expertise allowed her to work and publish on diverse archaeological contexts including Paleolithic Eurasia, Stone Age Africa, Iron Age Near East, Moche South America, and Teotihuacan-era Mesoamerica.

The public loves learning about archaeology through news stories, magazines, podcasts, and other mass media outlets. Many archaeologists are well positioned and motivated to create this content, but few know how to enter the mass media industry. This session will provide guidance for anyone interested in pop-science press—from those seeking to dip their toes to individuals who want to pivot careers to science journalism. Rolling back the curtain around pop-science media, we’ll discuss behind-the-scenes processes that transform stories from an author’s initial inklings to professional publications. These include how to “pitch” a story to popular outlets such as Discover or The New York Times and how to work with journalist editors. The seminar will also review different story types (such as op-eds, news, features), media (written, audio, visual, photo), and entryways including occasional contributions, internships, freelance work, and career paths.

  1. Survey story types and media
  2. Outline the development of a story from pitch to publication
  3. Discuss opportunities and career paths in archaeology public communication

Exploring Applications of 3-D Printing in Archaeology for Education, Public Outreach, and Museum Exhibits [Deeper Digs]

When: June 05, 2024 1:00-3:00 PM ET

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Bernard K. Means, PhD, RPA, Virginia Commonwealth University

Dr. Means's scholarly pursuits include reconstructing American Indian village spatial and social organizations, the research potential of archaeological collections, and the history of archaeology across the Americas, especially during the Great Depression. Dr. Means is also director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory, which is creating three-dimensional (3-D) digital models of historical, archaeological and paleontological objects used for teaching, research, and public outreach from across the Americas as well as northern India. He has 3-D scanned Ice Age animal bones from across North America, including some that were collected by Thomas Jefferson and a mastodon tooth that belonged to Ben Franklin and found in Philadelphia. Dr. Means is the author of Circular Villages of the Monongahela Tradition (2007) and editor of and contributor to the Shovel Ready: Archaeology and Roosevelt’s New Deal for America (2013), as well as numerous articles on the Monongahela tradition, New Deal archaeology, and applications of three dimensional (3-D) scanning and printing to archaeology, especially public outreach.

Three-dimensional (3-D) printing is increasingly infiltrating all aspects of society, from manufacturing and medicine to STEM education on K-12 levels. This seminar will explore the basics of 3-D printing and how archaeologists can integrate 3-D models and printed materials into all aspects of their discipline, from the field to the laboratory, and into the classroom and the museum. Particular attention will be paid to the following areas:

  • How digital 3-D models enhance identification of artifacts and ecofacts in the field and laboratory over 2-D drawings or photographs
  • How 3-D printed replicas expand opportunities for teaching and research at all levels of education, but especially for undergraduate teaching
  • How 3-D printed replicas can be incorporated into public outreach programs, maximizing access to the past, while minimizing risks to fragile heritage
  • How 3-D printed replicas can be integrated into museum exhibits to create a more interactive and tactile element

The 3-D printed past is not something from the far-off archaeological future but should be seen as very much a part of the archaeological present.

1. Describe the basic types of 3-D printers and finding a cost-effective solution to 3-D printing needs
2. Explain where to find or how to create your own digital 3-D archaeological models for printing
3. Explore ways to integrate 3-D printed replicas into all aspects of archaeological pedagogy and outreach